MAPPING GANDHI

ALTERNATIVE ENERGY
SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE
WATER MANAGEMENT
WOMEN'S EMPOWERMENT
VILLAGE INDUSTRIES

Throughout the developing world, women walk miles every day to gather firewood. As nearby forests are depleted, women are forced to walk farther and farther or to buy expensive cooking fuel. Burning wood for fuel also forces women to inhale dangerous amounts of smoke, and pollutes the atmosphere, releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide that contributes to global warming. Meanwhile, another source of fuel, cow dung, lies exposed and unused, leaking more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere.

Biogas systems convert cow manure into clean-burning cooking fuel. The manure from four cows produces enough fuel to satisfy the needs of a family. The Bajaj Foundation has constructed over 600 biogas units since 2009, transforming the daily lives of hundreds of families and contributing to the global fight against greenhouse gases. By capturing and using the gas produced by cow manure, biogas systems free women from the need to gather firewood, eliminate the harmful smoke associated with cooking, and help reduce greenhouse gases.

Gandhi believed in sustainability. Look at the farm he helped found in South Africa, Tolstoy Farm. Over a thousand acres, Tolstoy Farm boasted hundreds of fruit trees that produced almonds, walnuts, apricots, peaches, and figs. The farm was a model of sustainability. Water was transported manually from a nearby spring. Wastewater was gathered in buckets and used to water the trees. A compost system turned food waste into fertile manure. Human waste was also transformed into manure. Residents made their own sandals. It was, in Gandhi's words, "a busy hive of industry."

Gandhi's thoughts on Tolstoy Farm are available at here. Search for "Tolstoy Farm." Or explore other examples of Gandhi's writings on sustainability.

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This is a map of the impact of one man, Mahatma Gandhi, on a remote region of central India called Wardha. Gandhi came to Wardha because of its remoteness and because one of his most important supporters, the philanthropist Jamnalal Bajaj, offered land to build an ashram. The Sevagram Ashram, or“service village," would become Gandhi's last permanent home. In 2009 the Kamalnayan Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation, a trust established by the descendants of Jamnalal Bajaj, began to invest in the villages surrounding Gandhi's ashram. The Bajaj Foundation now works in over a thousand villages, supporting small-scale farmers through projects in water management, alternative energy, organic farming, village industries, and women's empowerment. The staff of the Bajaj Foundation understands their work as a direct legacy of Gandhi. But that legacy is far from simple. While Gandhi was a staunch critic of modern technology, the Bajaj Foundation employs a variety of technological solutions. Gandhi himself never reconciled the inconsistencies within his own views on how to attack poverty. This map is a way to understand one man's legacy—in all its rich complexity—and it is a challenge. How can we end the poverty that continues to haunt the people of Wardha, and many rural communities in India and throughout much of the world? GANDHI'S DISCIPLES
WHY WARDHA?
PEOPLE Professor Nico Slate Department of History Carnegie Mellon University slate@cmu.edu | 412-268-1408
ABOUT
GANDHI'S DISCIPLES This is a map of the impact of one man, Mahatma Gandhi, on a remote region of central India called Wardha. Gandhi came to Wardha because of its remoteness and because one of his most important supporters, the philanthropist Jamnalal Bajaj, offered land to build an ashram. The Sevagram Ashram, or“service village," would become Gandhi's last permanent home. In 2009 the Kamalnayan Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation, a trust established by the descendants of Jamnalal Bajaj, began to invest in the villages surrounding Gandhi's ashram. The Bajaj Foundation now works in over a thousand villages, supporting small-scale farmers through projects in water management, alternative energy, organic farming, village industries, and women's empowerment. The staff of the Bajaj Foundation understands their work as a direct legacy of Gandhi. But that legacy is far from simple. While Gandhi was a staunch critic of modern technology, the Bajaj Foundation employs a variety of technological solutions. Gandhi himself never reconciled the inconsistencies within his own views on how to attack poverty. This map is a way to understand one man's legacy—in all its rich complexity—and it is a challenge. How can we end the poverty that continues to haunt the people of Wardha, and many rural communities in India and throughout much of the world?
WHY WARDHA? PEOPLE Professor Nico Slate Department of History Carnegie Mellon University slate@cmu.edu | 412-268-1408
ABOUT
WHY WARDHA? GANDHI'S DISCIPLES This is a map of the impact of one man, Mahatma Gandhi, on a remote region of central India called Wardha. Gandhi came to Wardha because of its remoteness and because one of his most important supporters, the philanthropist Jamnalal Bajaj, offered land to build an ashram. The Sevagram Ashram, or“service village," would become Gandhi's last permanent home. In 2009 the Kamalnayan Jamnalal Bajaj Foundation, a trust established by the descendants of Jamnalal Bajaj, began to invest in the villages surrounding Gandhi's ashram. The Bajaj Foundation now works in over a thousand villages, supporting small-scale farmers through projects in water management, alternative energy, organic farming, village industries, and women's empowerment. The staff of the Bajaj Foundation understands their work as a direct legacy of Gandhi. But that legacy is far from simple. While Gandhi was a staunch critic of modern technology, the Bajaj Foundation employs a variety of technological solutions. Gandhi himself never reconciled the inconsistencies within his own views on how to attack poverty. This map is a way to understand one man's legacy—in all its rich complexity—and it is a challenge. How can we end the poverty that continues to haunt the people of Wardha, and many rural communities in India and throughout much of the world?
PEOPLE Professor Nico Slate Department of History Carnegie Mellon University slate@cmu.edu | 412-268-1408